outcomes that matter to individuals

7 03, 2019

Paper of the Week 07.03.2019: Future Directions in Valuing Benefits for Estimating QALYs: Is Time Up for the EQ-5D?

2019-03-07T12:21:36+00:00

Reference: Brazier J. E. et al (2019  This week’s paper of the week is brought to you by Professor Sir Muir Gray, 3V’s Founding Director. Bottom line, chosen by Muir from the paper This raises the issue of what is meant by “well-being.” A broad conception of well-being is how well an individual’s life is going on. Subjective well-being (SWB) has been described or categorised into 3 types: hedonism (well-being increases when an individual experiences more pleasure and/or less pain), flourishing theories (well-being increases when an individual fulfils their nature as a human being, or “flourishes”), and life evaluation or life satisfaction (well-being increases when an individual positively assesses his or her life). The notion of SWB is [...]

Paper of the Week 07.03.2019: Future Directions in Valuing Benefits for Estimating QALYs: Is Time Up for the EQ-5D?2019-03-07T12:21:36+00:00
1 03, 2019

Paper of the week 27.02.19: Has the NHS Long Term Plan forgotten we are all going to die?

2019-03-01T11:14:40+00:00

Reference: Has the Long Term Plan forgotten we are all going to die? (Bleakley T., Smith R., Taylor R) This week’s paper of the week is brought to you by Professor Sir Muir Gray, 3V’s Founding Director. Bottom line, chosen by Muir from the paper "One certainty is that there will be a lot of dying in the next 10 years as the baby boomers become the dying boomers... Increasingly, people endure slow deaths of frailty, often with dementia in the final years. Increased life expectancy is generally regarded as a cause for celebration, but many people fear dependency and dementia more than they fear death... Between a quarter and a third of health-care expenditure is for care [...]

Paper of the week 27.02.19: Has the NHS Long Term Plan forgotten we are all going to die?2019-03-01T11:14:40+00:00
13 02, 2019

Issue of the month – February 2019: End of Life Care

2019-02-13T08:55:47+00:00

Authors: Dr Karen Chumbley, Medical Director, St Helena Hospice and Dr Tim Wilson, 3V Bottom Line Much progress has been made since the End of Life strategy was published by the NHS in 2008. But more needs to be done; depending on where you live will alter the chance that you will die in the place you wish. For people dying with some conditions, more work is needed. And sadly, inequity appears to persist, even at this most moment in our life. We might hope that when we are dying, the health and care services, and the voluntary sector would work together to achieves the outcomes we wish. Multiple surveys have confirmed, for instance, that most people would [...]

Issue of the month – February 2019: End of Life Care2019-02-13T08:55:47+00:00
2 01, 2019

Paper of the week 02.01.19: Evidence and values in the NHS

2019-01-02T14:14:45+00:00

Reference: Evidence and values in the NHS: choosing treatments and interventions well. Margaret McCartney and Sam Finnikin. Br J Gen Pract 2019;  69 (678): 4-5 This week’s paper of the week is brought to you by Professor Sir Muir Gray, 3V Executive Director. Bottom line (chosen from the paper) But there is a concern that ‘value’ as currently practised may mean monetary cost coming first, and may be used to describe the values of a balanced accounting sheet rather than the personal values of an individual patient. Higher-quality care may happen to be less expensive, but cost should not be the sole arbiter. Yet the opportunity cost of doctors having to explain why CCGs are no longer funding prescriptions for ‘self-limiting’ conditions, rather than doing [...]

Paper of the week 02.01.19: Evidence and values in the NHS2019-01-02T14:14:45+00:00
17 10, 2018

Paper of the week 17.10.18: Trying to convince people to poo in toilets – what the NHS needs to learn

2018-10-17T11:45:26+00:00

Reference: Rural Sanitation in India: The Poo Party This weeks paper of the week is brought to you by Dr Anant Jani, 3V Executive Director. Bottom line “Transforming the behavioral norms of rural populations is a particularly challenging task, and it will only work if rural communities change from within…much depends on the extent to which civil society takes up the call, and whether and how the government pitches in to sensitize and support the fight….The other half of the challenge is uprooting deep-seated beliefs and taboos…Success will require long-term campaigns to spread awareness, the development of regionally contextualized innovations, focus-group discussions, and women’s empowerment.” Implications for value improvement  Getting people to change is not easy.  Habits, beliefs and [...]

Paper of the week 17.10.18: Trying to convince people to poo in toilets – what the NHS needs to learn2018-10-17T11:45:26+00:00